Welcome to the home page of the Wortley Villa website

Sad news

After developing a serious illness, David Wilson, driving force behind the Wortley Dig, died in early January 2016 at the age of 83.  Sadly, we now have to announce that in April 2022, Vicky followed David, dying at a hospice in Cheltenham after a period of illness.

The future of this website will be discussed with other members of the team and it is likely that the site will close to public access later in 2022.

NJD

This website is dedicated to the Excavation Project undertaken at Wortley Romano-British Villa that started in 1983 and closed in 1996.

Early days at the site © Tony Boxall

(Picture: early days at the site © Tony Boxall)

When the excavation ended, the main structure of the villa had been revealed but it became apparent that some of the complex lies outside the excavated area.  The reports cover work up to 1996 but some geophysical work continues to try to interpret the areas outside the original excavation. 

This site also provides information about the Friends of the Wortley Villa Excavation who met periodically after the dig closed.  There are copies of past newsletters, information about project members and some photographs.

Report cover The report on the excavation is now available to buy

"Report on the Excavation of a Romano-British Site in Wortley, South Gloucestershire"
by David Wilson, Alan Bagnall and Beryl Taylor

iv + 222 pages; illustrated throughout    |    BAR 591, 2014    |    ISBN 978 1 4073 1225 5

£48 plus P&P   Available from: Hadrian Books Ltd.,122 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7BP
Email to:  bar@hadrianbooks.co.uk

If you want find out more, read selected pages, search the site and reports or contact us direct.  For a brief account of the dig, there is a 4-page article (5 MB) by the excavation director, David Wilson, that can be downloaded; a 300 kB version is also available with lower quality pictures.

A note about the logo: the image on the top of the website pages is of a Roman buckle plate incised with a peacock (Latin: pavo) found on the site in 1985.  This gave the name to the newsletter, The Pavonian.